Executive Development Blog

Become a Better Leader this Fall at UNC

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Jun 29, 2017 10:46:50 AM

For over sixty years, UNC Kenan-Flagler has offered leadership development and business education programs designed specifically to help individuals reach their full potential. Our programs prepare business professionals at all levels with the knowledge and skills they need to think more strategically, make better decisions, and lead more effectively.

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We have a busy calendar of programs this Fall and registration is now open.  Upcoming programs include:

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Topics: leadership, leadership development

Developing Millennial Leaders

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Jun 27, 2017 11:32:33 AM

The millennial generation is not just about to enter the workforce. They are already there. In fact, the oldest millennial is already 37 years of age, yet employers and HR and talent management professionals act like the entirety of this generation is still living in their parents’ basements. While it is true that many millennials are recent college graduates still green behind the ears when it comes to their careers, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that they hold about 20 percent of all management jobs, up from just 3 percent in 2005. And as baby boomers retire, the number of millennials needed to assume leadership roles will rise exponentially—but employers struggle to accelerate their leadership development programs to properly prepare millennials to assume leadership positions.

_K3_0145.jpgThere is no shortage of studies that highlight why this ethnically diverse generation are technical natives, continuous learners, and excellent team players and collaborators. There is also no shortage of written work that highlights how millennials may disrupt the workplace. All of this research in the quest to discover how this generation will behave as a whole has led to the notion that all millennials share the same values and will likely behave in the same way in the workplace. This is simply not the case. Just like not all baby boomers will retire at age 65, not all millennials will be good team players. In fact, as millennials age, notable differences among them are emerging. One common thought about millennials is that they are serial job hoppers, yet there is evidence that millennials who have been in the workforce for a couple of years begin to form more conventional attitudes about work than millennials of the same age who are still in college.

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Topics: leadership, millennials, leadership development

How Leaders Can Influence Others to Drive Change

Posted by UNC Executive Development on May 9, 2017 2:16:40 PM

Imagine you are heading up a taskforce that consists of five of your peers from sales, marketing, research and development, operations, and human resources. The chief operating officer has asked the taskforce to come up with a solution to an organization-wide problem that has plagued the company for the past 48 months. The issue needs to be resolved sooner rather than later.

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As a leader in the organization, you have consulted with dozens of people inside and outside of your organization. You’ve done more research on this than anyone else on the taskforce and have the knowledge, skills, and proven track record to effect change. How will you effectively communicate your proposed solution to the other taskforce members? What can you do to get them to see the value of your ideas?

Obtaining buy-in from managers at all levels is critical when proposing a change initiative because, while it may rapidly improve an organizational problem, there is also the risk of hitting the bottom line and lowering employee morale if the initiative fails.

To increase the likelihood of getting your recommendations taken seriously and implemented, you, as a leader, must have effective influence skills.

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Topics: leadership, change management, leadership development, change

Knowledge Transfer: Grasp Technology but Don’t Forget the Human Factor

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Apr 6, 2017 2:16:43 PM

As aging baby boomers reach retirement age over the next two decades, many organizations face a potential mass exodus of their senior leaders. While the economic downturn may have delayed retirement for many baby boomers, these valued employees will retire eventually, taking with them a lifetime of knowledge and skills that are difficult, if not impossible, to replace. HR and Talent Management professionals must ask the question, “How do we facilitate the transfer of knowledge from one generation of workers to the next?” Technology has helped make this process easier, but it’s important not to lose the “human factor” which could make or break the overall transfer process.

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Lauren Dixon of Talent Economy wrote a great article this week featuring UNC Executive Development’s Kip Kelly.  When asked about technology use in the transfer of knowledge he said, “Technology has limitations, especially when it comes to knowledge transfer from one generation to the next.” In other words, organizations should not underestimate the importance of the human element in knowledge transfer. “Baby boomers have critical experience and skills — tribal knowledge that an organization must work to retain,” Kelly said. “They have stories that capture and convey the culture of an organization.” These stories show why the human factor is important and essential.

Lauren Dixon writes, “Business leaders should prepare for workers to leave their organizations in droves. This year, baby boomers are between 53 and 71 years old, according to Gallup, which means the average boomer is in their mid-60s. Retirement is just around the corner for many in this cohort, meaning a whole lot of knowledge is about to walk out the door.”

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Topics: leadership, leadership development

The Benefits of Women in the Workplace

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Mar 14, 2017 1:57:47 PM

Nearly 50 years ago, The Personnel Administrator (the precursor to the Society for Human Resource Management’s HR Magazine) published the article, “Women at Work: One of the Most Controversial Issues of the Sixties,” by Dr. Daniel Kruger. The article examined the societal, labor and economic forces that were compelling women to join the workforce. As to why he wrote the article, Kruger noted that “our concern here is with the role of women in the labor force. We leave others to discuss the impact of working women on family life, mental health, juvenile delinquency, and on society as a whole.” (SHRM, 2008).

wib-1.jpgThe debate surrounding women in the workforce has shifted somewhat in 50 years, but it still continues. In 1964, women comprised nearly 40 percent of the U.S. labor force (up from 32 percent in 1948). Today, women make up 61 percent of the labor force and are attaining college-level degrees at a faster rate than their male counterparts [Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in U.S. Department of Commerce et al, 2011].

There are definite rewards for organizations that target women in their recruiting, development and retention efforts.  Take a look at our white paper on the topic titled The New Business Imperative: Recruiting, Developing and Retaining Women in the Workplace by clicking below.

Click to Download Full White Paper

UNC Executive Development offers a 3-day workshop on the above topics and much more for women in the workplace.  Click here to learn more about our Women in Business program.

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Topics: leadership, leadership development, learning and development

Myths vs. Truths on Older Generations of Workers

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Mar 2, 2017 1:14:10 PM

As aging baby boomers reach retirement age over the next two decades, many organizations face a potential mass exodus of their senior leaders. While the economic downturn may have delayed retirement for many baby boomers, these valued employees will retire eventually, taking with them a lifetime of knowledge and skills that are difficult, if not impossible, to replace.

transfer.jpgTransferring the knowledge from older workers to a new generation will be essential for organizations to remain competitive.  Those that understand will reap the rewards.  The following are some myths and facts on the different generations.

Myths about Older Workers

1.Older workers are less productive than younger workers.
2.Older workers cost more to employ.
3.Older workers are not really motivated—they’re just biding their time until retirement.
4.Older workers are preoccupied with the past and have little interest in the future.
5.Older workers have old-fashioned values and are traditional thinkers. They are overly conservative.
6.Older workers are mentally and physically impaired.
7.Older workers are often ill and absent from work.
8.Older workers are resistant to change.
9.Older workers are unable to learn new skills and new ways of doing things.

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Topics: leadership, millennials, leadership development

Preparing Leaders to Succeed in a Global World

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Feb 16, 2017 10:56:42 AM

Below is a summary of our most recent white paper written by Horace McCormick. You can download the full paper below.

Globalization is a fully loaded freight train that cannot be stopped. According to the Wells Fargo International Business Indicator survey released in late April 2016, 47 percent of U.S. companies surveyed expected their profits from international activity to increase in 2016, and 87 percent of companies agreed that international expansion was needed for long-term growth. In addition, 60 percent of survey respondents expected their international business to increase in 2016, and 54 percent of survey respondents believed that the international component of their businesses would become more important over the next 12 months. All this despite a global business environment that is often described as more volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (VUCA) than ever before.

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This global VUCA landscape makes developing globally competent leaders more important than ever. In fact, 63 percent of the organizations surveyed for a 2015 University of North Carolina (UNC) and Human Capital Institute (HCI) study on global competencies said there was an urgent need to develop globally competent leaders, yet only 48 percent thought their training and development was realistic to the challenges they have found when working on a global scale. Another study by McKinsey found that 76 percent of multinational organizations said they needed to develop global competencies, but only 7 percent thought they were doing so very effectively. That same study found that nearly a third of U.S. organizations said they had not pursued international business opportunities because they lacked competent employees who could operate in a global arena.

Developing globally competent leaders is important to global—and to not-yet-global—organizations because it gives them a competitive advantage over their peers. The UNC/HCI global competence survey found that 88 percent of currently global organizations and 29 percent of local, regional, and national organizations anticipate using international teams in different countries within the next three years. And 86 percent of currently global and 22 percent of local, regional, and national organizations are also planning to expand their operations into other countries in the next three years.

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Topics: leadership, leadership development, global mindset

Build Your Leadership Pipeline

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Feb 7, 2017 1:20:42 PM

Businesses today face a number of challenges to operate efficiently and maintain competitive advantage and it is often incumbent upon company leadership to provide the proper direction to help their teams navigate these challenges and adapt appropriately. Without a steady pipeline of talented individuals with the knowledge, skills and experience to step into leadership roles, or an effective process to identify high-potential employees and give them the necessary training to be effective leaders, the company will be unprepared to handle the changes and challenges of the future.

UNC Executive Development has designed a three day leadership development program to help organizations invest in their talent, and build a leadership pipeline which will guarantee success in the years to come.  The Leadership Effectiveness Workshop allows participants to sharpen their leadership skills needed for both personal and professional growth. Participants will learn more about their own leadership style and how to effectively maximize their strengths as leaders. 

Here’s what some of the program’s faculty have to say about leadership:

 

 

Learn More about  Leadership Workshop

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Topics: leadership, leadership development

Three Days to a Better Leader

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Jan 31, 2017 1:45:22 PM

Businesses today face a number of challenges to operate efficiently and maintain competitive advantage and it is often incumbent upon company leadership to provide the proper direction to help their teams navigate these challenges and adapt appropriately. Without a steady pipeline of talented individuals with the knowledge, skills and experience to step into leadership roles, or an effective process to identify high-potential employees and give them the necessary training to be effective leaders, the company will be unprepared to handle the changes and challenges of the future.

Leadership-2.jpgDeveloping yourself as a better leader and also those around you is more important than ever.  The Leadership Effectiveness Workshop at UNC Executive Development is designed specifically for business professionals currently serving in a leadership role, or anticipating leadership responsibilities in the future. The leadership skills training received will also benefit individual contributors who are not serving in a management role but who lead and influence others in their organization.  After completing the three-day program you will gain:

  • Increased awareness of personal leadership strengths
  • Understanding of how effective leaders influence attitudes and behaviors
  • Enhanced strategic thinking, problem-solving and negotiation skills
  • Ability to use power and influence others to drive results
  • Improved ability in leading teams successfully

To learn more about this program, download a brochure below.

Learn More about  Leadership Workshop

Interested in other topics? We offer a broad portfolio of leadership development programs. Check out our updated calendar here.

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Topics: leadership development

Learn and Lead with UNC Executive Development

Posted by UNC Executive Development on Jan 12, 2017 11:55:27 AM

For over sixty years, UNC Kenan-Flagler has offered leadership development and business education programs designed specifically to help individuals reach their full potential. Our programs prepare business professionals at all levels with the knowledge and skills they need to think more strategically, make better decisions, and lead more effectively.

OE Mailer cover Jan 2017.jpgFaculty: UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School faculty excel in both teaching and research and are fully immersed in the challenges of the business world. Their expertise extends beyond the classroom through their work in corporate and entrepreneurial settings, service on company boards, and consulting with organizations around the world. By bringing their real-world experience and research into the classroom, they help to create truly exceptional learning experiences for working professionals – focusing on practical skills and tools that can be applied immediately to real-world challenges.

Location: All programs are held at the Rizzo Conference Center, our world-class facility located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. All of the amenities at the Rizzo Conference Center are designed to create a unique learning experience that is unparalleled.

Audience: UNC Executive Development has a variety of programs designed to support business professionals throughout their career. From new managers to senior executives and everyone in between, our programs attract working professionals who want to strengthen their business acumen and become better leaders. Individuals can create a unique learning experience by attending multiple programs to earn a certificate from UNC Kenan-Flagler. Visit our website for more details on our certificate programs.

Discounts: Discount and scholarship opportunities are available for individuals and organizations that qualify. Interested applicants are encouraged to apply early.

Download our program brochure below to see which program opportunities are best for you and your organization this year.

Click to Learn More about UNC's Leadership Programs

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Topics: leadership, leadership development